Tag Archives: silhouette

In Guatemala – Part three: Lake Atitlán.

(continued from Part two: The coffee farmer on the volcano.)

A loud thud resonates through my bones as my head slams into the metal ceiling once again as the driver forgets to tap his brakes in lieu of an oncoming speed bump. I can attest to the strength of this inconspicuous van, in that my head hasn’t yet left even a dent in the roof despite repeated attempts. There are speed limit signs here in Guatemala, but in a country where low literacy rates result in buses needing…

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Winterpeg.

A blizzard doesn’t arrive with the surprise that it used to. Watching the radar, murmurs of what may be coming are uttered from the lips of weather reporters and citizens alike. Parking bans are set on city streets, pantries are stocked, and commuters set their alarm clocks a little earlier than usual in hope that they will be able to get to work at all.

When the rumoured weather does arrive, there are two choices: seek shelter, or step out into the storm. Personally,…

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  • KareniaMarch 13, 2018 - 8:21 pm

    I particularly like the last photo 🙂ReplyCancel

  • AllisonMarch 19, 2018 - 1:19 pm

    Beautiful! ReplyCancel

Live at the Winnipeg Folk Festival 2017.

Another year, another festival.

Over the years, the Winnipeg Folk Festival has become a point of confluence for the people in my circles. Despite life having taken us in so many directions – detours rooting from children, careers, and the plethora of other catalysts for change – we always come back together for this one weekend every year. We return not just the location, but a safe place for expression, creativity, and being. With all that’s going on in the world,…

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  • KarenAugust 2, 2017 - 8:19 am

    This sort of made me feel as if I was able to attend the whole festival 🙂ReplyCancel

  • BruceAugust 8, 2017 - 3:22 pm

    Spectacular! Nice words, photos, AND VIDEO!!ReplyCancel

  • DanielAugust 16, 2017 - 12:22 pm

    Folk yeah!ReplyCancel

Life Behind Bars – Part 3: Friendly territory around the Salish Sea.

(continued from Part 2: Four corners of the Haida Gwaii by bicycle)

Ferries provide access all the way down British Columbia’s otherwise inaccessible coast.  From the Haida Gwaii, this was the peaceful expressway to access southern British Columbia without making a huge diversion inland.  Port Hardy, at the northern tip of Vancouver Island, was the port of arrival for the push to southern Vancouver Island and ultimately Vancouver, and it was also where…

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  • Allison StorsethMarch 29, 2017 - 8:37 pm

    Enjoyed reading! Thanks for sharing David 🙂ReplyCancel

  • KareniaMarch 30, 2017 - 4:00 am

    It is such a treat to be able to get a full sense of your travels through pics and words, balanced out with the stories we share on our wanders 🙂ReplyCancel

  • Mark ReimerMarch 30, 2017 - 11:57 am

    Looks great Dave!! I’m heading out to Vancouver Island in a week for a little tour on my bicycle, but sadly I only have under a week. Still, this photos are getting me even more excited.ReplyCancel

    • DavidMarch 30, 2017 - 4:06 pm

      Have a great adventure out west Mark – short and sweet is still sweet! 😀ReplyCancel

Presenting…Pecha Kucha!

On February 23rd, 2017, I will be speaking at Pecha Kucha Winnipeg – an event organized by the Manitoba chapter of the Society of Graphic Designers of Canada.  Amidst simply trying to conquer my stage fright, I will be centering my talk around the subject of “Contemplating Contemplation”; weaving in stories and insights garnered from the several months of traveling around remote parts of western Canada by bicycle on my Pedal Powered to the West bike tour

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  • RachelMarch 4, 2017 - 2:27 pm

    Cool! Sounds interesting. Please post a link when it’s available online!ReplyCancel

  • AnaMarch 12, 2017 - 11:09 am

    ? I didn’t see any stage fright in your presentation! Very insightful – do more of this sort of thing please. ?ReplyCancel

Northern summer in Churchill

When we hear a reference to “the north” an image of windswept tundra blanketed by snow and ice immediately rises to mind.  That, or maybe Santa Claus.  Even in the high arctic though, summer does arrive; the land takes on a very different look than that which we imagine and attracts seasonal animals that travel great distances to get there.

This past August I witnessed the brief northern summer for the first time with my own eyes and, of course, …

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  • SusanNovember 12, 2016 - 11:39 am

    Beautiful series. I just got home from Churchill myself and now (in November) it’s hard to believe it’s the the same place you’ve pictured here. I want to go in the summer now too…ReplyCancel

  • Angie RickwaltJanuary 9, 2017 - 6:12 pm

    Lovely photos! I’m looking to go in August of this year. Can you suggest any guides to use?

    Thanks!ReplyCancel

    • DavidJanuary 10, 2017 - 2:57 pm

      Hello Angie! Thanks for the message.

      In summertime there are less guided options than in other seasons, but I’m happy to say that the two major expedition companies operating out of the town itself at this time of year are both very good. Check out Sea North Tours for getting out on the water or Frontiers North for accessing the tundra with a buggy. Private guided options are always available if you have the desire and means, but I would start with the group options to get a taste.

      Have a great trip!ReplyCancel