Tag Archives: Manitoba

Winterpeg.

A blizzard doesn’t arrive with the surprise that it used to. Watching the radar, murmurs of what may be coming are uttered from the lips of weather reporters and citizens alike. Parking bans are set on city streets, pantries are stocked, and commuters set their alarm clocks a little earlier than usual in hope that they will be able to get to work at all.

When the rumoured weather does arrive, there are two choices: seek shelter, or step out into the storm. Personally,…

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  • KareniaMarch 13, 2018 - 8:21 pm

    I particularly like the last photo 🙂ReplyCancel

  • AllisonMarch 19, 2018 - 1:19 pm

    Beautiful! ReplyCancel

Nopiming with a paddle.

In classic Canadian fashion, this past weekend I headed out to Nopiming Provincial Park in Manitoba with some close friends for a quick canoe trip. Taking advantage of the unseasonably warm late-October weather this was to be our last hurrah before the snow came, and I couldn’t have asked for better weather or company.

Here are some photos of good people, their beards, a couple canoes, and, of course, the beautiful wilderness of Canada; for which I am all grateful.…

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  • Dave BensonOctober 26, 2017 - 4:24 pm

    Doesn’ t get any betterReplyCancel

Presenting…Pecha Kucha!

On February 23rd, 2017, I will be speaking at Pecha Kucha Winnipeg – an event organized by the Manitoba chapter of the Society of Graphic Designers of Canada.  Amidst simply trying to conquer my stage fright, I will be centering my talk around the subject of “Contemplating Contemplation”; weaving in stories and insights garnered from the several months of traveling around remote parts of western Canada by bicycle on my Pedal Powered to the West bike tour

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  • RachelMarch 4, 2017 - 2:27 pm

    Cool! Sounds interesting. Please post a link when it’s available online!ReplyCancel

  • AnaMarch 12, 2017 - 11:09 am

    ? I didn’t see any stage fright in your presentation! Very insightful – do more of this sort of thing please. ?ReplyCancel

Northern summer in Churchill

When we hear a reference to “the north” an image of windswept tundra blanketed by snow and ice immediately rises to mind.  That, or maybe Santa Claus.  Even in the high arctic though, summer does arrive; the land takes on a very different look than that which we imagine and attracts seasonal animals that travel great distances to get there.

This past August I witnessed the brief northern summer for the first time with my own eyes and, of course, …

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  • SusanNovember 12, 2016 - 11:39 am

    Beautiful series. I just got home from Churchill myself and now (in November) it’s hard to believe it’s the the same place you’ve pictured here. I want to go in the summer now too…ReplyCancel

  • Angie RickwaltJanuary 9, 2017 - 6:12 pm

    Lovely photos! I’m looking to go in August of this year. Can you suggest any guides to use?

    Thanks!ReplyCancel

    • DavidJanuary 10, 2017 - 2:57 pm

      Hello Angie! Thanks for the message.

      In summertime there are less guided options than in other seasons, but I’m happy to say that the two major expedition companies operating out of the town itself at this time of year are both very good. Check out Sea North Tours for getting out on the water or Frontiers North for accessing the tundra with a buggy. Private guided options are always available if you have the desire and means, but I would start with the group options to get a taste.

      Have a great trip!ReplyCancel

As the eye sees it: A polar bear on the tundra.

This post is of a slightly different nature than usual: over the past two months I have spent a considerable amount of time with bears: black bears, grizzly bears, and polar bears.  Every situation is different – the roadside encounter, alpine surprises on the trail, or actively tracking them on the tundra.  Regardless, respect for an animal’s territory is always of paramount importance to minimize their stress level.  Wanting to get too close is unrealistic,…

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  • KarynNovember 1, 2016 - 4:18 pm

    I always wondered what it would actually be like up on the tundra. Thanks for showing a glimpse of what the eye actually sees.ReplyCancel

  • DavidNovember 6, 2016 - 10:22 am

    You’re welcome Karyn. A guide I was with on this trip was telling me about a research study done up there regarding the interaction of polar bears with people, and 90% of the bears will actually curiously approach the tundra vehicles…kind of like a reverse zoo where humans are the attraction. So, there are occasions when you can get close to the bears under the guidance of a good guide – emphasis on the necessary guidance of someone who understands the animals and environment.ReplyCancel

Interstellar Rodeo Festival: Building a Green Room.

From the wilderness to the urban jungle, this past week has been a different sort of an adventure: Adrienne Shum and I built and ran the Green Room at the Interstellar Rodeo festival here in Winnipeg.  This entailed transforming a concrete bunker tucked away backstage into a functional kitchen and cozy lounge for the festival artists.  Lighting, refrigerators, furniture, food…we had to bring all that in, alongside a team of hard working volunteers,…

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  • JasonAugust 20, 2016 - 5:44 pm

    That’s a lot of hard work , especially on your bikes! Lol. Good job. X2ReplyCancel

  • Sara StasiukAugust 21, 2016 - 7:53 pm

    I love this so much. ✨???ReplyCancel