Tag Archives: Canada

Postcards from Kananaskis.

Every year, as the calendar flips from August to September, the flow of tourism that descends upon Canada’s natural wonders retreats back to urban comfort. As the wild returns to the wilderness, so do I for my annual shoulder season adventure. This has become an annual pilgramage for me over the years. With all the wildfires that have been tearing through western Canada this year, my plans were more fluid than usual…and by fluid, I mean that backcountry plan after…

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  • DeniseOctober 29, 2017 - 4:54 pm

    Beautiful! I would love to experience the wild the way you do one day David.ReplyCancel

The power of photography.

A while back, the good folks over at local multimedia company Build Films asked me to write a piece for them about the power of photography.  This is the published article, crossposted here to my own website for your own reading:

Alone, witnessing winter’s first snowfall in Canada’s Yoho National Park.

Here at base camp, the waterfalls are running thinner than I’ve ever seen them; the glaciers above that feed them are returning to their frozen state.  …

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  • Roger S.April 14, 2017 - 5:19 am

    Oh, very nicely said! I fully agree that the camera retains for us moments that will never happen in the same way. This is the beauty of photography.ReplyCancel

  • AnaMay 18, 2017 - 11:01 am

    ? Well said David. Your view of the world is rather unique and refreshing – thanks for sharing it. I think it’s safe to say that I originally came for the photos but stay for the writing. ?ReplyCancel

Mountain moments.

It is tempting in life to want to see it all; to cover as much ground as possible and leave footprints in a long list of places.  This breadth of experience does have its merits, but it also has its sacrifices: namely, depth within each experience.  Personally, I increasingly value the depth side of experience and choose adventures that are more in the slow travel category these days rather than trying to see the entire map.  There really is a big difference between…

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  • Allison StorsethFebruary 13, 2017 - 7:39 pm

    Thank you for sharing! I really enjoyed reading (and viewing)ReplyCancel

  • RobynFebruary 14, 2017 - 1:39 pm

    Wow David! You really capture the feeling of the mountains well – like, the best! Really, it’s hard (I’ve tried). Keep it up and I look forward to when you return. 🙂ReplyCancel

  • KareniaFebruary 14, 2017 - 3:32 pm

    This may be my favourite photo essay of yours yet.ReplyCancel

Postcard from the Canadian Rockies.

Autumn meets winter in Larch Valley.

It’s shoulder season again – my favourite season – and we’ve just been chased down from the alpine of the Canadian Rocky Mountains by bad weather.  The sky had been threatening all morning, but in the mountains such threats make no promises one way or another so we went ahead and hit the trail up to Sentinel Pass.  Hours later, the weather finally materialized overhead and a cold wet snow blew heavy in our faces with …

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  • DanielNovember 14, 2016 - 8:55 pm

    Wow! This is surreal. Like, out of my dreams surreal.ReplyCancel

Northern summer in Churchill

When we hear a reference to “the north” an image of windswept tundra blanketed by snow and ice immediately rises to mind.  That, or maybe Santa Claus.  Even in the high arctic though, summer does arrive; the land takes on a very different look than that which we imagine and attracts seasonal animals that travel great distances to get there.

This past August I witnessed the brief northern summer for the first time with my own eyes and, of course, …

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  • SusanNovember 12, 2016 - 11:39 am

    Beautiful series. I just got home from Churchill myself and now (in November) it’s hard to believe it’s the the same place you’ve pictured here. I want to go in the summer now too…ReplyCancel

  • Angie RickwaltJanuary 9, 2017 - 6:12 pm

    Lovely photos! I’m looking to go in August of this year. Can you suggest any guides to use?

    Thanks!ReplyCancel

    • DavidJanuary 10, 2017 - 2:57 pm

      Hello Angie! Thanks for the message.

      In summertime there are less guided options than in other seasons, but I’m happy to say that the two major expedition companies operating out of the town itself at this time of year are both very good. Check out Sea North Tours for getting out on the water or Frontiers North for accessing the tundra with a buggy. Private guided options are always available if you have the desire and means, but I would start with the group options to get a taste.

      Have a great trip!ReplyCancel

As the eye sees it: A polar bear on the tundra.

This post is of a slightly different nature than usual: over the past two months I have spent a considerable amount of time with bears: black bears, grizzly bears, and polar bears.  Every situation is different – the roadside encounter, alpine surprises on the trail, or actively tracking them on the tundra.  Regardless, respect for an animal’s territory is always of paramount importance to minimize their stress level.  Wanting to get too close is unrealistic,…

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  • KarynNovember 1, 2016 - 4:18 pm

    I always wondered what it would actually be like up on the tundra. Thanks for showing a glimpse of what the eye actually sees.ReplyCancel

  • DavidNovember 6, 2016 - 10:22 am

    You’re welcome Karyn. A guide I was with on this trip was telling me about a research study done up there regarding the interaction of polar bears with people, and 90% of the bears will actually curiously approach the tundra vehicles…kind of like a reverse zoo where humans are the attraction. So, there are occasions when you can get close to the bears under the guidance of a good guide – emphasis on the necessary guidance of someone who understands the animals and environment.ReplyCancel