Tag Archives: Hiking

Postcards from Kananaskis.

Every year, as the calendar flips from August to September, the flow of tourism that descends upon Canada’s natural wonders retreats back to urban comfort. As the wild returns to the wilderness, so do I for my annual shoulder season adventure. This has become an annual pilgramage for me over the years. With all the wildfires that have been tearing through western Canada this year, my plans were more fluid than usual…and by fluid, I mean that backcountry plan after…

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  • DeniseOctober 29, 2017 - 4:54 pm

    Beautiful! I would love to experience the wild the way you do one day David.ReplyCancel

Canada’s wild places and us.

Hiking in the Canadian Rocky Mountains.

Every time I find myself returning home to Canada, I am awed by the vast open spaces we have here. Every. Single. Time. The contrast with the high human density common in most other places around the world is stark, and this uniquely shapes both the land and all of us creatures who call Canada home.

Even today, in our modern world, the word Canada conjures up strong images in our minds of expansive landscapes. In this there is a shared…

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  • DanielJune 30, 2017 - 12:59 pm

    Well said David. I admit I was originally really excited about the free park passes this year, but after the initial excitement wore off I feel the same as you.ReplyCancel

Backcountry in my own backyard.

When you think about it, plane travel can be a jarring experience; rising early, entering the corrals of airports with a ticket in hand, and coming out the other side in vastly different culture and environment…the differences introduced within a single day can be extreme and quick.  Getting outside of your comfort zone can lead to a lot of growth on the road, but equally important is the potential for these contrasts to help you appreciate at home what you may have…

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  • Daniel C. CrumpJune 18, 2017 - 9:45 am

    Amazing what is in our own backyard. Sorry I missed the trip, not sorry I missed the wood ticks ?ReplyCancel

  • HenkJune 18, 2017 - 10:23 am

    Excellent blog! I envy you sometimes for your travels, far and close by…

    HenkReplyCancel

Life Behind Bars – Part 3: Friendly territory around the Salish Sea.

(continued from Part 2: Four corners of the Haida Gwaii by bicycle)

Ferries provide access all the way down British Columbia’s otherwise inaccessible coast.  From the Haida Gwaii, this was the peaceful expressway to access southern British Columbia without making a huge diversion inland.  Port Hardy, at the northern tip of Vancouver Island, was the port of arrival for the push to southern Vancouver Island and ultimately Vancouver, and it was also where…

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  • Allison StorsethMarch 29, 2017 - 8:37 pm

    Enjoyed reading! Thanks for sharing David 🙂ReplyCancel

  • KareniaMarch 30, 2017 - 4:00 am

    It is such a treat to be able to get a full sense of your travels through pics and words, balanced out with the stories we share on our wanders 🙂ReplyCancel

  • Mark ReimerMarch 30, 2017 - 11:57 am

    Looks great Dave!! I’m heading out to Vancouver Island in a week for a little tour on my bicycle, but sadly I only have under a week. Still, this photos are getting me even more excited.ReplyCancel

    • DavidMarch 30, 2017 - 4:06 pm

      Have a great adventure out west Mark – short and sweet is still sweet! 😀ReplyCancel

Mountain moments.

It is tempting in life to want to see it all; to cover as much ground as possible and leave footprints in a long list of places.  This breadth of experience does have its merits, but it also has its sacrifices: namely, depth within each experience.  Personally, I increasingly value the depth side of experience and choose adventures that are more in the slow travel category these days rather than trying to see the entire map.  There really is a big difference between…

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  • Allison StorsethFebruary 13, 2017 - 7:39 pm

    Thank you for sharing! I really enjoyed reading (and viewing)ReplyCancel

  • RobynFebruary 14, 2017 - 1:39 pm

    Wow David! You really capture the feeling of the mountains well – like, the best! Really, it’s hard (I’ve tried). Keep it up and I look forward to when you return. 🙂ReplyCancel

  • KareniaFebruary 14, 2017 - 3:32 pm

    This may be my favourite photo essay of yours yet.ReplyCancel

Postcard from the Canadian Rockies.

Autumn meets winter in Larch Valley.

It’s shoulder season again – my favourite season – and we’ve just been chased down from the alpine of the Canadian Rocky Mountains by bad weather.  The sky had been threatening all morning, but in the mountains such threats make no promises one way or another so we went ahead and hit the trail up to Sentinel Pass.  Hours later, the weather finally materialized overhead and a cold wet snow blew heavy in our faces with …

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  • DanielNovember 14, 2016 - 8:55 pm

    Wow! This is surreal. Like, out of my dreams surreal.ReplyCancel